The Recording Industry Association of America, which has spent the past five years suing tens of thousands of individual file-sharers for copyright infringement, has apparently decided to change tactics, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal (hopefully this one is a little more reliable than the recent story about Google’s views on net neutrality). The good news is that they are going to stop suing 13-year-olds and retired war veterans and single mothers for downloading music. The bad news is that their new plan involves cutting sneaky backroom deals with Internet service providers to take a so-called “three strikes” approach: They let the ISP know when they think you’ve been sharing copyrighted material, and the provider agrees to send you an email warning; the second time, you get a letter; do it again and your Internet access gets cut off.

(read the rest of this post at GigaOm)

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Mathew 2414 posts

I'm a Toronto-based former senior writer with Gigaom and my favorite things to write about are social technology, media and the evolution of online behavior

4 Responses to “RIAA switches to “three strikes” approach”
  1. Too bad, I would've liked to see the RIAA sue the music-thieving children of that Warner CEO.

  2. It should be interesting to note that on the Canadian side, isohunt.com has decided to preemptively sue the CRIA and RIAA over its downloading practices.

  3. Too bad, I would've liked to see the RIAA sue the music-thieving children of that Warner CEO.

  4. […] RIAA switches to “three strikes” approach (mathewingram.com) […]

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