Hey, didn’t you hear? Blogs are so 2004. They’re dead now, says Paul Boutin (who also writes for Valleywag) in a piece he wrote for Wired magazine. Here’s his argument (such as it is) in a nutshell:

“The blogosphere, once a freshwater oasis of folksy self-expression and clever thought, has been flooded by a tsunami of paid bilge. Cut-rate journalists and underground marketing campaigns now drown out the authentic voices of amateur wordsmiths.

It’s almost impossible to get noticed, except by hecklers. And why bother? The time it takes to craft sharp, witty blog prose is better spent expressing yourself on Flickr, Facebook, or Twitter.”

Wow — that’s pretty persuasive, isn’t it? You can’t miss with a great environmental metaphor like that. I guess I had better stop blogging then. To tell you the truth, I’m kind of surprised that Paul didn’t put a headline like “Twitter and Facebook have killed blogging” on his piece. Things are always killing other things in the kind of world Boutin describes. And what evidence do we have that blogs aren’t the place to be any more? Just this: Jason Calacanis quit blogging and moved to an email newsletter, and Robert Scoble is mostly doing video posts and Twittering.

So there you have it. Case closed. Jason Calacanis, whose blog was intended solely to promote the entity known as Jason Calacanis, and Robert Scoble — a man who claims it’s possible to interact in a meaningful way with 10,000 Twitter friends and 50,000 Facebook friends. These are the people Boutin wants us to look to for guidance on how to live our lives online? At the end, just to make sure you haven’t missed it, Paul summarizes his point in a Twitter-style paragraph:

“@WiredReader: Kill yr blog. 2004 over. Google won’t find you. Too much cruft from HuffPo, NYT. Commenters are tards. C u on Facebook?”

I’m hoping that Boutin’s post took about the same amount of time as it did to come up with that Twitter message, because it has about as much value. Is everyone going to have a blog? No — and they never were. Facebook and Twitter are probably enough for many people. Not writing at all is enough for many people. But why does it have to be all or nothing? What we have now is the option to micro-blog (i.e., Twitter) some thoughts, post others to Facebook, share things on FriendFeed or through Google Reader, and blog things that take longer to think through. But I guess that’s not as catchy as a “blogs are dead, Twitter killed them” scenario.

Update:

Seamus McCauley calls Boutin’s post “flagrant flamebait,” which I think is probably true. And I fell for it :-) And so did Tish Grier.

About the author

Mathew 2406 posts

I'm a Toronto-based former senior writer with Gigaom and my favorite things to write about are social technology, media and the evolution of online behavior

73 Responses to “Blogs are so over, Wired magazine says”
  1. Right on, I totally agree with nyou

  2. […] start with the seemingly glass half empty post from Mathew Ingram, quoting the Wired article with his tongue way in his cheek: To tell you the truth, I’m kind of […]

  3. […] brew-ha-ha about the death of blogging last week didn’t really surprise me much (See Mark Evans, Mathew Ingram, Wired and Tish Grier). I had a post percolating in my head about the whole issue, but it wasn’t […]

  4. […] Blogs are so over, Wired magazine says — mathewingram.com/work – In answer to Paul Boutin. "Is everyone going to have a blog? No — and they never were. Facebook and Twitter are probably enough for many people. Not writing at all is enough for many people. But why does it have to be all or nothing?" […]

  5. Paul's weak-ass link bait clarifies exactly why blogging might not be an option for him.

  6. […] Blogs are so over, Wired magazine says […]

  7. […] Continue Blogs are so over Posted in Thought of the day. […]

  8. […] Matthew Wingram sarcastically responds Wow — that’s pretty persuasive, isn’t it? You can’t miss with a great environmental metaphor like that. I guess I had better stop blogging then. […]

  9. […] have heard the idea behind “Blogging Is Dead…” We have also heard about the death of newspapers and the traditional media journalists that […]

  10. Hehe, I liked the update part, I do not agree to the claim about the death of blogs. Blogs are here to stay and grow, but he's probably right that the era of naïve and grassroots blogging by amateurs is long gone and it's being professionalized (if that's a word).

    In Denmark, where I live, blogs are only beginning to become rich and important sources for inspiration and information and I see a lot of people using their blogs for exciting things that the facebook platform or twitter is too sterile for. Blogs are a format for easy publishing, not a hype like facebook “Which Pizza are you?” apps…

  11. :)

    Great post

    It couldn't be that any one would want a blog to simply-write!

  12. But a lot of the info that people are posting on twitter or on facebook are information written on people's blogs?

  13. This post is just hype. The issue is not blogs vs social media sites. It's beyond that.

  14. RT @tweetmeme 5b Blogs are so over, Wired magazine says http://tinyurl.com/5r3yer

  15. […] esto que debemos dejar de bloggear, pues no. Como bien señalan Mathew Ingram y Seamus McCauley en sus respectivos blogs, es la clásica postura de señalar que una […]

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