Google knows what bloggers want

Boy, does Google know the way to a blogger’s heart or what? According to the Wall Street Journal, the company is setting up an 8,000 square-foot blogging playground at the Democratic National Convention (and at the subsequent Republican convention), complete with food, massages, smoothies, a candy buffet and couches to nap on — all for the measly sum of $100 for access to the “Big Tent.” The money quote in this particular story goes to Micah Sifry of TechPresident.com, who says that there isn’t really much news out of the partisan conventions once the vice-presidential candidates are picked, but “it’s a target-rich environment for bloggers.” Especially the candy-fueled kind. Simon Owens has more on the Big Tent at the MediaShift blog.

6 thoughts on “Google knows what bloggers want

  1. Very cool! I don't know much about “media tents”, is it normal to charge for it, or do conventions etc typically just give access to journalists/bloggers for free?

    Or is the point that “normal” (independent? non-affiliated?) bloggers can't get into normal press areas and thus this is their area to hang out? Wasn't clear to me from the WSJ article, as it mentions at the Republican convention, 200 bloggers do have press passes.

    • As far as I know, it's not normal for there to be “tents” that companies sponsor, where journalists have to pay for access. It kind of surprises me that Google would do that, actually — I would have expected them to provide it for free. But perhaps they felt that providing it for free would cause a perception of bias.

      • Although at $100, if you're making a trip out across country, getting a hotel, etc it's not a bad price at all. Its not free but it won't break you

        Maybe they figured free would just be overrun with random people who were in the area, who aren't even bloggers. At $100 you have to at least sort of want to see what it's about before going inside =)

  2. Very cool! I don't know much about “media tents”, is it normal to charge for it, or do conventions etc typically just give access to journalists/bloggers for free?

    Or is the point that “normal” (independent? non-affiliated?) bloggers can't get into normal press areas and thus this is their area to hang out? Wasn't clear to me from the WSJ article, as it mentions at the Republican convention, 200 bloggers do have press passes.

  3. As far as I know, it's not normal for there to be “tents” that companies sponsor, where journalists have to pay for access. It kind of surprises me that Google would do that, actually — I would have expected them to provide it for free. But perhaps they felt that providing it for free would cause a perception of bias.

  4. Although at $100, if you're making a trip out across country, getting a hotel, etc it's not a bad price at all. Its not free but it won't break you

    Maybe they figured free would just be overrun with random people who were in the area, who aren't even bloggers. At $100 you have to at least sort of want to see what it's about before going inside =)

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