My blog is my social network

by Mathew on December 12, 2007 · 7 comments

Anne Zelenka has an interesting post up at GigaOm about the latest venture from Chris Messina, also known as Factory Joe or Mr. Tara Hunt. It’s an attempt to roll a kind of social-networking architecture into WordPress, one of the most popular blogging platforms around and the one I usually recommend to friends who want to start blogging (and the platform I use for this blog and others). Chris has a post about what he calls “the inside-out social network” here.

I’m going to read some more about it, since it seems to have something to do with OpenID and some other stuff as well — and Chris says that it will start with WordPress but should be able to work with all sorts of platforms — but I like the idea. Anne’s post has a great quote from copyblogger Brian Clark, who says that creating content through a social-networking application like Facebook is “like remodeling the kitchen in a house you rent.” That’s a good way of putting it.

  • http://factoryjoe.com Chris Messina

    Heh, Mr. Tara Hunt. I love you Canadians! ;)

    Srsly though, I'd be interested in your thoughts on the project; it's literally neo-natal right now, just beyond a sparkle in anyone's eye. Still, I think it raises the issue about what social networking might look like if it never *started* as a bunch of silos… I'm going mostly on a hunch that being able to have the choice between joining a big silo or rolling your own social node is something that would be good for the current state of affairs, since currently we really can't say, with any credibility, that running your own blog today really puts you in league with the social dexterity of the mega social nets.

  • http://www.mathewingram.com/work mathewi

    We're very loveable :-)

    I definitely like the idea, Chris — even if it is only a glimmer of
    one. I know that I (and I'm sure many others) instinctively feel a
    kind of force pushing me away from things like Facebook, despite its
    many useful features, because I'd rather control my own information
    and the way I present it. But as you point out, there are lots of
    larger benefits to being a part of those walled gardens or social
    nets.

    Just out of curiosity, how do you see DiSo working with Google's OpenSocial?

  • http://www.drumsnwhistles.com/ Karoli

    That's exactly how I've felt about most of these different social networks. I use Facebook, but my updates come from my blog and my photo streams rather than from Facebook outward. It never made sense to me to invest a ton of time in updating a Facebook page when I already have my own site, weblog, and photo communities (Flickr/Zooomr) where I have control of my content. So I'll feed things to Facebook but never the other way around.

    I'm very interested to see where Chris is going with this.

  • http://factoryjoe.com Chris Messina

    Heh, Mr. Tara Hunt. I love you Canadians! ;)

    Srsly though, I'd be interested in your thoughts on the project; it's literally neo-natal right now, just beyond a sparkle in anyone's eye. Still, I think it raises the issue about what social networking might look like if it never *started* as a bunch of silos… I'm going mostly on a hunch that being able to have the choice between joining a big silo or rolling your own social node is something that would be good for the current state of affairs, since currently we really can't say, with any credibility, that running your own blog today really puts you in league with the social dexterity of the mega social nets.

  • Pingback: Facebook vs. Google — the social wars - - mathewingram.com/work

  • http://www.mathewingram.com/work mathewi

    We're very loveable :-)

    I definitely like the idea, Chris — even if it is only a glimmer of
    one. I know that I (and I'm sure many others) instinctively feel a
    kind of force pushing me away from things like Facebook, despite its
    many useful features, because I'd rather control my own information
    and the way I present it. But as you point out, there are lots of
    larger benefits to being a part of those walled gardens or social
    nets.

    Just out of curiosity, how do you see DiSo working with Google's OpenSocial?

  • http://www.drumsnwhistles.com/ Karoli

    That's exactly how I've felt about most of these different social networks. I use Facebook, but my updates come from my blog and my photo streams rather than from Facebook outward. It never made sense to me to invest a ton of time in updating a Facebook page when I already have my own site, weblog, and photo communities (Flickr/Zooomr) where I have control of my content. So I'll feed things to Facebook but never the other way around.

    I'm very interested to see where Chris is going with this.

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