Is the newly launched Apple tablet, the iPad, beautiful? Yes. Drool-worthy, in fact. Will Apple sell a lot of them? If the iPod and the iPhone are anything to go by, then yes — and at $499 for the basic version, they are priced to move. But does the iPad contain anything that could be seen as throwing a lifeline to the foundering ship of traditional media? Well, no.

Once you get past the hype (of which there has been a boatload), the iPad is really just a larger version of the iPod touch, with some interface and usability tweaks thrown in around things like email, games and e-books. Has the iPhone changed the traditional print media business? Not at all — unless you think selling an app for your publication (as Conde Nast has for GQ) is a game-changer.

Yes, the New York Times app looks impressive, with video that plays right inside the newspaper display (although you can do that on the NYT web site, too). But will a fancier app change the nature of the newspaper business or the magazine business? No.

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Mathew 2414 posts

I'm a Toronto-based former senior writer with Gigaom and my favorite things to write about are social technology, media and the evolution of online behavior

7 Responses to “Will the iTablet help the media? Possibly. Save the media? No.”
  1. Twitter Comment


    [blog post] Will the iTablet help the media? Possibly. Save the media? No. [link to post]

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  2. Twitter Comment


    Agreed with @mathewi Will the iTablet help the media? Possibly. Save the media? No. [link to post]

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  3. Twitter Comment


    RT @mathewi: [blog post] Will the iTablet help the media? Possibly. Save the media? No. [link to post]

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  4. (Just as a disclosure; I work at Forbes.com)

    I agree the iPad isn't really a savior of anything. But it is a step in the right direction for media and publishing companies that take advantage. The iPad goes a long way in capturing the appeal of traditional print media, that previously wasn't possible. With a full color screen, multi-touch, portability, and a magazine-sized screen, reading an e-newspaper or e-mag will feel much more like reading a print version. I think that user comfort and familiarity should not be undervalued.

    Eric Fulwiler
    Publisher Recruiter
    Forbes.com
    @EF_Forbes

  5. You said it right, the ipad is actually just a bigger version of the ipod touch. The one thing that I dont like about it is the fact that their browser does not have Flash support. However, I am sure it will still do well in the market considering that its Apple and a lot of people always want to have a taste of that thing….

  6. The one thing that I dont like about youtube it is the fact that their browser does not have Flash support.

  7. Definitely worth the investment. This is simply unbelievable! Definitely worth the investment.

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